Set up Your Medical ID on your iPhone

I just did this and it is VERY easy! You should too! AppleInsider gives us simple steps on

How to set up your emergency Medical ID with iOS 8’s new Health app

One of the lesser known — but potentially most important — features of Apple’s newly released iOS 8 mobile operating system is a digital “Medical ID,” which can provide important personal health related information in the event of an emergency.

The Medical ID feature is built in to the new Health application found in iOS 8 for iPhone. Users can configure it by launching Health, tapping the Medical ID menu in the bottom right, and then choosing “Create Medical ID.”

iPhone users with a passcode-locked handset can consider enabling the “Show When Locked” function, providing first responders or anyone else with emergency access to their Medical ID. Enabling this feature allows the Medical ID to be viewed by swiping the lock screen, tapping “Emergency,” and then viewing the digital information.

A user’s Medical ID can be configured with a custom picture and name, date of birth, list of medical conditions, notes, allergies, reactions and medications. It also allows users to display an emergency contact with name, telephone number, and relationship.

The Medical ID also allows users to enter their blood type, height and weight, and whether they are an organ donor. And if someone changes their mind about having such information available from their lock screen, all of the Medical ID information can be deleted via one button at the bottom of the editing page.

After the Medical ID has been created, users can always go back and make changes at any time through the Health app.

Medical ID is just one function of the new Health application in iOS 8, which aims to become a centralized repository for all of a user’s health information, whether input manually or automatically collected through iPhone accessories.

The more advanced Health functions with connected applications and accessories have not yet gone live, as Apple apparently encountered last-minute bugs with its new HealthKit application programming interface tools for developers. Apple abruptly began pulling HealthKit-enabled applications from the App Store last week, alongside the launch of iOS 8, indicating that a formal launch for Health-compatible apps would come at a later date.

For more features and functions in iOS 8, see AppleInsider’s ongoing iOS Tips series.

I Love Almonds!

I love almonds! I eat them almost everyday – either raw, roasted or in my green smoothie. I even love almond milk! Here are some interesting facts from NutriLiving:

What’s Going on with Almonds?

Did you know that California supplies 80 percent of the world’s almonds? Not only do they help manage weight and combat diabetes, they are also one of the most nutrient-packed tree nuts on Earth! Get your almond Blast ready with these fun facts about one of our favorite NutriBlast boosts!

 

Foods You Shouldn’t Refreeze After Thawing

Good to know! We freeze a lot of things to reduce waste (empty nesters here), but I will look at these tips before refreezing! Great tips from Kitchn:

5 Foods You Should Never Refreeze

TIPS FROM THE KITCHN

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Freezing food is a great way to have meals on the go and food stashed away to avoid last minute trips to the grocery store or ordering delivery. It also helps us not to waste food and is, in a sense, an extension of our pantry.

But we’ve all been there. We rifled through our freezer and pulled out a few things to thaw in the fridge and promptly forgot about them. Can you put it back in the freezer? Here’s a list of five things that you should avoid giving a refreeze and why refreezing in general is a big no-no.

 2

What Happens When You Freeze

Freezing anything ruptures some of the cell walls in the product at hand. It’s why frozen food doesn’t taste quite as good as fresh and why oftentimes frozen foods aren’t as expensive as their fresh counterparts, especially meat and seafood.

What Happens When You Refreeze

When you freeze, thaw and refreeze an item, the second thaw will break down even more cells, leaching out moisture and deliciousness and changing the integrity of the product.

The other enemy is bacteria. Frozen and thawed food will develop harmful bacteria faster than fresh. It’s not something you can see, so it’s easy to brush off, but the threat is real. Once the ice crystals from your food are gone, your food starts the clock on developing these nasty buggers.

Freezing and thawing of foods is a big safety concern and there are legal restrictions for the restaurant and grocery industries to help keep us all safe. Applying these same philosophies in our own home will ensure the same!

How to Handle Thawed Food

Your best bet will always be to cook or utilize what you thawed and if needed, refreeze the cooked product. That said, there’s not always time to cook it, so if you’re in a hurry and debating whether or not to throw it back in the freezer, keep in mind these five things that should never, ever be refrozen!

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1. Raw Proteins

This includes meats, poultry and seafood. If they were thawed in a chilled environment that’s less than 42 degrees (like your refrigerator), then it’s safe to refreeze. But if they thawed on the counter or have an off color or smell, they’re done!

Don’t forget that a lot of seafood, especially shrimp, arrive at the grocery store frozen but are defrosted to be put into the display case. They’ve already gone through a first freeze, so don’t put them in your home freezer for a second freeze!

2. Ice Cream

If you left it out on the counter so that it was easier to scoop and then forgot to put it back in the freezer quickly, just drink it as a milkshake and call it a day folks. Refrozen ice cream will have a weird, icy texture.

3. Juice Concentrates

Fermentation occurs quicker than you think in fruit-based products, so don’t forget that this goes for blended smoothies too.

4. Combination Meals

Eat up your casseroles, pot pies, stews, pastas, and the like or bring it for lunch so that it doesn’t go to waste. After all, it’s cooked and ready to go so it’s the easiest kind of homemade meal to have!

5. Cooked Proteins

Freezing leftover roasted or rotisserie chicken is a great idea, but then you pulled it out for salads a few weeks later and forgot about it in your fridge. Call some friends over and put the chicken on nachos ASAP, because it shouldn’t be refrozen!

Don’t forget that there are also some foods that you should never freeze in the first place! Check out that list before you stock up at end-of-season farmers markets!

Pair Food with your Spices

I love pairing – wine and food or in this case spices with food! Take a look at this handy chart that Lifehacker brings us on

How to Pair Your Spices with Food

This Chart Tells You How to Pair Your Spices with Food

(click on the graphic above to go to the full chart)

Mixing herbs and spices in meals can be healthy, but you still need to know which spice goes with what ingredient. Spice Advice has a chart you can refer to for quick decisions.

The spreadsheet covers everything from allspice to thyme, and is divided into different ingredients or dishes:

  • Appetizers
  • Soups
  • Eggs & Cheese
  • Meats
  • Fish & Seafood
  • Salads
  • Sauces & Relishes
  • Vegetables
  • Breads & Desserts

While not a comprehensive list, it should cover most common foods and spices. It’s not an easy link to remember, so bookmark it.

Spice Usage Tips | Spice Advice via Reddit

What to Look For When Buying Vegetables

I love vegetables (always have!) and it can be confusing when trying to buy the best. From Lifehacker we get a cool

Infographic Tells You What to Look For When Buying Vegetables

This Infographic Tells You What to Look For When Buying Vegetables

If you are unable to tell which tomatoes are ripe or if that lettuce is fresh, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has a helpful guide on how to select vegetables at the supermarket.

We’ve talked about some of this before, but we figured it would be perfect to put it in an easy-to-scan, printable infographic format. Save it on your phone or print it out and take it to the store, and you’ll always have the freshest veggies. Check it out below.

This Infographic Tells You What to Look For When Buying VegetablesEXPAND

Other important advice while buying produce:

  • Handle produce carefully. Someone must pay for vegetables ruined by rough handling. In the long run, it will probably be you.
  • It’s a good idea to cook your vegetables as soon as you’re home, so as to make them last longer.
  • Don’t buy because of low price alone. It doesn’t pay to buy more vegetables than you can properly store in your refrigerator or use without waste. Most fresh vegetables can be stored for 2 to 5 days, except for root vegetables, which can be stored from 1 to several weeks.
  • Don’t shy away from irregular or misshapen vegetables, says WonderHowTo. They often have the best taste, according to Brian Everett of Jacob Farms/Del Cabo Organics.
  • If your tomatoes need further ripening, keep them in a warm place but not in direct sunlight. Unless they are fully ripened, do not store tomatoes in a refrigerator—the cold temperatures might keep them from ripening later on and ruin the flavor.
  • Is that corn or pumpkin ripe to eat? Here’s how to tell.
  • This infographic only covers vegetables, but we also have some advice on picking fresh, ripe fruit.

How to Buy Fresh Vegetables [PDF] | United States Department of Agriculture

Build a Healthy Salad

This is a great infographic on 8 easy steps to creating a healthy salad. Details from Cleveland Clinic:

8 Ways to Make a Super Healthy Salad (Infographic)

Experiment with flavors, textures and colors

Want to discover a simple, delicious way to get your four servings of vegetables per day? Fix a salad. Start with the right kind of greens. Choose from a broad range of veggies – or even fruit – to add color, texture and flavor. Include a healthy source of protein to satisfy your appetite. Then top it off with heart-healthy dressing. Below are tips for creating healthy, beautiful salads you can celebrate.

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