Artist’s 3D Typography Gives New Life to Forgotten Books

Cool idea for any and all book lovers!

3D Typography

And more designs here:
Flickr: Book Of Art’s Photostream

From Lifehacker:

The written word can indeed be considered art, with the author’s descriptions creating vivid scenes in the mind of the reader. But only rarely do the pages themselves actually become artwork, as they have at the hands of Isaac Salazar.

Working with the pages of “discarded and unloved” books he creates rather striking and ingenious examples of three dimensional typography.

His “Book of Art” collection is only just getting off the ground at Etsy, but there are plenty of other examples available within his Flickr gallery, should 3D book typography art strike your fancy.

Since this site was born as a gadget blog, however, I have to ask: When will some intrepid artistemold a tablet into an elaborate Tablet of Art origami creature? [Etsy, Flickr via Boing Boing]

Palm fronds recycled as do-it-yourself succulent centerpiece

This is a clever idea! From LATimes:

Recycle Palm Fronds into a Centerpiece!

Recycle Palm Fronds into a Centerpiece!
The fallen palm fronds left from recent winds haven’t been a nuisance for master gardener Jill McArthur. Armed with a pruning saw, the Glendale garden designer has been recycling the fronds as arresting table centerpieces using succulent cuttings.

PalmsDSCN1940McArthur likens the fronds to fallen fruit: “They are all over the place,” she said. “I find them when I walk my dog. I try to find different things to do with them.”

To create a centerpiece, McArthur first looks for a nice line. If a frond is too large, she puts it in her car and cuts it down at home. She then sprays the hollow surface with a low-VOC clear sealant so water won’t leak through to the table. Next she adds cactus soil mix and succulent cuttings to make a low-maintenance, low-water arrangement.

The palm fronds, which can be as long as 12 feet, form “fabulous boats” that look great on a long table or a mantel. She also likes to pair two boats, as shown at the top of the post.

“The plants seem to be very happy,” McArthur said. “You can trade succulents in and out. They are strong and not heavy, so they are easy to transport. The natural tone of them is so beautiful — the brown is fantastic. I personally like the ragged edges of the smaller ones. The whole point is for them to look like found objects.”

The Straw Bale Pallet Crate Garden – Simple, Attractive – And Cheap

This inexpensive and creative small garden will even fit most apartment patios! Cool design by Old World Garden Farms:

A simple crate planter made from pallets and using a straw bale for a growing medium

A simple crate planter made from pallets and using a straw bale for a growing medium

So you have little space, little time, little money and you still want to garden.  Or maybe you would like to add a great looking focal point to your existing garden or landscape to grow something unique.   Even better, maybe you know of someone who still likes to garden but can’t get out or handle as much of the physical activity anymore.

Here is a great solution to all three!  Create your own Pallet Straw Bale Crate Garden.  It’s attractive, simple to build, and best of all, low or no cost to make.

To build on the cheap, you can create the straw bale frame using the slats from a single pallet

To build on the cheap, you can create the straw bale frame using the slats from a single pallet

With a single pallet, (3) 2x4x8′s, a bale of straw, and a bag or two of soil and compost – you can create an instant garden space that can provide fresh vegetables or flowers all summer long.

You can purchase all the materials you need for under $15.00 – or build for virtually free using pallets and scrap lumber.   We made a few single bale boxes last week for our garden – and will use them along our fence row to grow our cucumbers in.  You can also double the measurements to make a double bale box and plant to your heart’s content.

The straw bale crates have a lot of built-in advantages!  They are easy to maintain – with little weeding ever needed.  The 2’ high design lends itself to less stooping and bending while tending, and the combination straw, compost and soil make for a great instant growing medium – without the hassle of digging up the earth.

The best part of all – at the end of the season – you can add all of the contents to the compost pile –or start a compost pile right in the pallet box to have fresh compost next year when you’re ready to grow again!

Here is how we made ours:

Start by assembling 2 rectangle frames from scrap wood or 2 x 4's.

Start by assembling 2 rectangle frames from scrap wood or 2 x 4′s.

Next - attach the two rectangles with four of your slat boards in each corner

Next – attach the two rectangles with four of your slat boards in each corner

Next - screw in additional slat boards to create the crate "look".

Next – screw in additional slat boards to create the crate “look”.

Materials List:

(1) Straw Bale
(4) 2 x 4 x 20”
(4) 2 x 4 x 44”
(1) Pallet – for vertical boards – be sure to use untreated pallets to be “food safe”
(1) bag of compost – substitute your own for free material
(1) bag of topsoil – substitute your own for free material

***The straw bales we use measure 20″ wide, 18″ high and a little less than 46″ long. Bales can vary in length – so be sure to measure your bale to adjust the length and width of frame boards.  You can also reference our previous post’s on How To Disassemble A Pallet Quickly, and How To Make Your Own Compost for more info.

Building The Garden:

Assemble 2 rectangles from your 2×4’s – screwing or nailing together 2 of the 20” pieces and 2 of the 44” pieces.   Once you have both rectangles together – use your pallet boards to attach vertically to connect the two rectangles to create your straw bale box.

We cut our pallet slat boards into 18″ lengths, (we got about 2 boards for each slat) and then screwed them into the inside of the two frames to form the crate. The spacing is up to you – we put about 4” between each board for ours – we wanted the look of an “old-time” crate.

Planting The “Garden”

Next -use a sharp knife, reciprocating saw or shovel to dig out a 6 to 8" planting hole

Next -use a sharp knife, reciprocating saw or shovel to dig out a 6 to 8″ planting hole

Simply place your plant in the hole and cover with more soil.

Simply place your plant in the hole and cover with more soil.

We like to put a layer of compost or mulch over the top of the bale to complete the look.

We like to put a layer of compost or mulch over the top of the bale to complete the look.

Now it’s easy – place the bale down inside the frame – you may need to wiggle a little and cut a little off here and there to get it to fit depending on the size of the bale.

Simply use a sharp knife or blade to cut out your planting holes – we went about 8” deep and 5” around– filling them with a good mixture of garden soil and compost.  Plant, cover up, water – and the garden is in!  Depending on what you plant – you can fit in 5 to 6 tomato plants, or a combination of pepper and tomato plants per bale, etc.  You can plant a little closer than traditional garden rows because of the raised beds.  Only your imagination is the limit to what you want to grow!

You will get some compression of the bale as the season progresses – the bale will slowly decompose, giving even more nutrients to the plants.  Your plant and roots will thrive in the soil, compost and straw because the garden is off the ground – there will be very little weeds that develop, and should be easy with the added height to pick and maintain.

End of the Season :

If you have a compost bin already set up – you can certainly take the contents and throw them into the pile.  The decomposed straw and soil mixture are great for a pile – adding a lot of carbon material. If not – use the crate box as a compost bin!  Mix up the bale and contents right in the pallet box structure – and start adding some shredded fall leaves, coffee grounds,  vegetable scraps , lawn clippings and more.  By next spring – you will have enough compost made to use in the next bale for planting, with extra if you need it.

So how about trying a straw bale pallet crate garden this year!  And if you have a neighbor or relative that loves garden but finds it difficult now – it’s a great gift to let them have their very own garden

Happy Gardening – Jim and Mary

Custom Lighting Made from Paper Cups, Spoons and Coffee Filters

Wow – this is taking the recycling effort to a whole new level! I had posted this example earlier, but take a look now!

Custom Lighting Made from Paper Cups, Spoons and Coffee Filters by Christian DuCharme paper lighting interior design design

From ThisIsColossal:

Custom Lighting Made from Paper Cups, Spoons and Coffee Filters by Christian DuCharme paper lighting interior design design

Custom Lighting Made from Paper Cups, Spoons and Coffee Filters by Christian DuCharme paper lighting interior design design

Custom Lighting Made from Paper Cups, Spoons and Coffee Filters by Christian DuCharme paper lighting interior design design

The folks over at CollaCubed spotted these great custom lights by Christian DuCharme installed at the Lafayette Espresso Bar and Market in New York. The first is the 300 Cups Lamp made from, yes, 300 paper coffee cups while the others are made from plastic spoons and coffee filters. A really striking use of materials. See more photos here.

Spool Bookcase

I love all things upcycling (<– click there for some examples) especially wooden pallets. Now PinkStiches shows us how to make a cool bookshelf out of s spool:

Spool Bookcase Pink Stitches

I’m pretty sure most of my spending money goes towards books and fabric. I have more books than I know what to do with and probably ten more books on the way from Barnes & Noble as I’m typing out this post. What do I do? Get rid of some? Nonsense! Make room for more!! This bookcase was inspired by this lovely pin that I stumbled upon a few months ago. My hubby has a bunch of these fabulous spools at work and I made him bring me one this week so I could make this beauty!


Here is what you’ll need to make your own:

  • A small cable spool
  • Wooden dowels
  • 3 to 4 casters (swivel wheels)
  • Molding glue
  • Saw
  • Measuring Tape
  • Paint
  • Drill and screws

 


I’ve been asked where you can find these types of spools. They come in a variety of sizes, this being the smallest one. Mine measured a little over 1 foot. These types of spools or reels are used for cable or electrical wire so you might want to check your local Home Depot or ask your electrician if they have any they’re throwing out. My husband works in the oil field and they are everywhere so it’s easy for me to get my hands on one.

To get started, you’ll need to paint your spool and your dowels. I used a white Behr paint with the primer already mixed into it. I tried covering up one side of the table using four coats and did not like the result. The flaws stood out a lot more (and not in a good way). I painted the other side with only two light coats and loved it. It has a beautiful vintage and worn look.


After it dries, turn it upside down and position your caskets where you want them. This picture shows three wheels but I ended up using four so it wouldn’t topple over. Just drill them into place.


Next, measure the gap between the top and the bottom of the table. This will be the size your wooden dowels should be. Using the saw, cut about 5-6 dowels.


Using molding glue, position and place the dowels around the table about a foot apart and hold in place while they dry. If you cut them down to the perfect size, you don’t even need to hold them. They should just stand on their own.


Now fill it with books and admire your new bookcase!! It’s not too fancy, but it’s cozy and it makes me smile. Enjoy!

Clever things to do with Pallets

I have posted about upcycling shipping pallets before, but I wanted to have one post with some of my favorite things you can do with these wonderful things! Take a look (click on the pictures to go to the specific instructions):

How to Turn a Pallet into a Garden

Post image for How to Turn a Pallet into a Garden

Turn a Pallet into a Rainy Day Shoe Rack

Turn a Pallet into a Rainy Day Shoe Rack

Pallet desk

Folding Pallet Chair

IMG_7071.JPG

Entertainment Center (TV holder AND Theater Seating!)

Country Sofa

Home plan ideas sofa con palets Rustic sofa with pallets

Paracord Laced Pallet, Hanging Chair

CIMG0782.JPG

Pallet Loungers